Violin Electric recordings, 78rpm shellac rip

Young Menuhin and Oystrakh are inimitable, Oystrakh has a unique interpretation of Scriabin. Kreisler is amazingly good at showing the despair of the second part of Brahms's concerto, Tchaikovsky of 1946 Przygoda is as expressive as it could be. Oistrakh-Yampolsky-Oborin’s 1950s recording quality are no longer as beautiful as prewar ones, but Oistrakh's violin still sings excellent, especially in the "Reflection". Goldstein is an example of a great Soviet recording of the 1930s, unfortunately the record has some cracks.

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Prokofiev Violin Concerto No.1 – Oystrakh-Gauck, 1955 LP Rip

A special record by its nature. Andantino creates a wary, mystical mood — a surreal atmosphere that keeps you in suspense until the very end of the concert.

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Prokofiev Violin Concerto No.1 – Oystrakh-Kondrashin, 1957 LP Rip


RTU RSFSR 618-57 – the record is similar to the TU-1kl of the early 1950s — all the music in the palm of your hand. The Oistrakh’s violin is crystal clear, rhythmically and dynamically adjusted, melodic. Kondrashin’s orchestra is also on its top.

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Beethoven – Violin Concerto, D. Oystrakh 1952 LP Rip


TU-1kl 33 with a small red apple – the first Soviet LP records with surprisingly contradictory sound: the orchestra is clamped, sharp, while the solo instruments are clear, clean and with incredibly subtle intonations. Oystrach and his Stradivarius are in great shape on this record, they are a single whole, creating a musical narrative, interesting from beginning to the end. Oystrakh starts playing from the third minute and no longer lets anybody go off.

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