Violin Electric recordings, 78rpm shellac rip

Young Menuhin and Oystrakh are inimitable, Oystrakh has a unique interpretation of Scriabin. Kreisler is amazingly good at showing the despair of the second part of Brahms's concerto, Tchaikovsky of 1946 Przygoda is as expressive as it could be. Oistrakh-Yampolsky-Oborin’s 1950s recording quality are no longer as beautiful as prewar ones, but Oistrakh's violin still sings excellent, especially in the "Reflection". Goldstein is an example of a great Soviet recording of the 1930s, unfortunately the record has some cracks.

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Violin acoustic recordings, 78rpm shellac rip

The great violinists of the early 20th century: melancholic Vasa Prihoda, refined Misha Elman, Jan Kubelik – the great phrasing master, the effortless-bow of Erika Morini and the pedantic style of Eugen Ysaye. Together with Kubelik sings unforgettable Nellie Melba.

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Jascha Heifetz acoustic recordings, 1917-1920 78rpm shellac rip

Little Yasha Heifetz was able not only to show off at unattainable for others tempo, but had a quite sofisticated taste and sounded beautifully. It is well audible on Ave Maria and Spanish dance. Common remasterings are often dull this moments but here you can feel it as good as it should be.

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Brahms Violin Concerto – Joseph Szigeti, Hamilton Harty – 1928 78rpm shellac rip


For every lover of violin music it is impossible to avoid this album, Brahms – Szigeti's concerto blossoms with unusual colors. Record is not immediately discloses its pros, but the violin sounds quite well from the very beginning. The first side has some cracks.

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Brahms Double Concerto – Thibaud, Casals, Cortot – 1929 78rpm shellac rip


This record made strong impression in analogue but after digitization the orchestra suffered greatly – the dynamics were smoothed, the clear tone weakened. The soloists on the first side recorded too quietly, starting from the second side the balance had been corrected. Something wrong happened with Victor's equipment on the last side: strange HF resonance appeared and the violin began to sound with distortions. Despite all this, what genuine emotions are audible in the record, how open and emotionally clean Thibault's violin sounds!

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Mozart violin concerto #3 – Yehudi Menuhin, Georges Enesco – 1935 78 rpm shellac rip


Menuhin plays very beautifully, his pre-war records belong to the gold fund of violin music. In the recording we hear the typical, somewhat covered and colorated sound of Victor, the set is prefabricated: the first part is a reissue of the 1940s, the second and third parts – the Japanese first press of the 1930s. The losses of The Victor reissue are not as great as they were in Columbia and Decca, although in analog the quality deterioration was obvious, after the digitizing it almost fades.

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Django Reinhardt and Stefane Grappelly, 1935-1938 Decca personality series 78prm shellac rip


The post-war reissue, to estimate the loss of reissue clarity you can compare it with Honeysuckle Rose and Night and Day on the Ace Of Club vinyl, losses are definitely great. Well, Django himself – one of a kind, no one except him could not and can not extract from the acoustic guitar such a dense and expressive sound. The same can be said about Grappelli's graceful violin, as if created for a swing.

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J.S.Bach — Concerto in A minor— Guberman, Dobroven — 1934 78rpm shellac rip


A prefabricated set of records from the 1930s, the first record sounds clearer. The orchestra is written so-so, the violin is amazing. Guberman is considered not only a virtuoso, but also a great interpreter.

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J.S.Bach — Concerto For Two Violins — Szigeti, Flesch – 1937 78rpm shellac rip

A compilation of records from different sets, the first record from the United States is recorded with serious loss of clarity, the sound of the second, English version is great, but it is printed on a crackling mass of English HMV. In the first movement, you can appreciate the Szigeti violin with its emphasized upper formant, somewhat angular and beautiful in this angularity. Thanks to the efforts of American technicians, the Flash instrument sounds helpless, and only at the end of Largo and in the final it becomes clear that two equally great masters are playing, and their instruments are as good as their masters. It should also be noted that the orchestra is well-coordinated, emphasizing the expression of the allegro.

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J.S.Bach — Concerto For Two Violins — Jascha Heifetz , 1952 78rpm shellac rip


Both parts are recorded by Heifetz using an overdubbing. The recording is considered a failure, in my opinion, because of the relatively dull sound and the unsuccessful first movement: the tempo is too high, the orchestra plays monotonously, the violins do not differ in tone or style. I think because of this, many people never got to hear Largo, the first half of which is played and recorded musically perfectly. In the second part of Largo, the violins lost their voice, but the finale is recorded very well-expressively and with mood.

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