Charlie Parker : Why the bird? – 1950th Mono Vinyl Rip


When we listening to Charlie Parker through the Internet it is difficult to understand why they call him The Bird – the digitization muffles the unique sound of his instrument and inspired passages. Initially substandard recordings are also interfered – there were only two illustrative tracks among five LPs, I placed them at the beginning of the collection. These beautiful melodies allow you to appreciate the genius of Bird. I wonder where is he flying now.

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Charlie Parker 1947-1949 Dial and Live Broadcast – Mono Vinyl Rip


Parker's early recordings on Dial are full of drive, inspiration and craftsmanship, the quality of the shellac originals is above all praise. Unfortunately, it is not possible to get these 78 discs, and vinyl reissues presented here sound by all criteria worse. At Pickwick, all records were passed through the reverb, but even such recordings with a competent remastering often sound preferable and give a better idea of Parker's playing than technocratic digitizations from the originals on YouTube, so let them be here. Maybe someone will love them, as I once listened to this particular Pickwick album and fell in love with the music of "Bird of Paradise".

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Miles Davis and John Coltrane, 1957-1959 LPs mono Rip


A remarkable period of Miles Davis and John Coltrane cooperation, the records are more than good, even russian perestroika copy album and the German 1980s reissue of Relaxin' sound good . Miles's muted trumpet sounds natural, I would also strees your attention on Red Garland's cool piano sound in Oleo and If I Were A Bell.

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Benny Goodman and his orchestra, 1936-1947 78rpm shellac rip


The Goodman Orchestra at the height of its fame – dance melodies that do not claim to be sophisticated or refind. Vocals by Helen Foster, Peggy Lee and Martha Tilton.

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Coleman Hawkins – 1940th 78rpm shellac rip


Hawkins plays and sounds very good. The lovely LO-FI disks of the 1940s are mostly worn out, especially "Mop Mop" with Art Tatum's chic solo.

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Django Reinhardt and Stefane Grappelly, 1935-1938 Decca personality series 78prm shellac rip


The post-war reissue, to estimate the loss of reissue clarity you can compare it with Honeysuckle Rose and Night and Day on the Ace Of Club vinyl, losses are definitely great. Well, Django himself – one of a kind, no one except him could not and can not extract from the acoustic guitar such a dense and expressive sound. The same can be said about Grappelli's graceful violin, as if created for a swing.

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Charlie Parker & Lester Young – 1950th 78rpm shellac rip

In my opinion in jazz there were two saxophonists who talked to God on equal terms – it's Charlie Parker and John Coltrane. Parker's recordings presented here were made in 1952, during this period of creativity in almost all Parker’s improvisations feel a piercing sadness – two years later he will die at the age of 34. Young’s records are a wonderful LO-FI of the early 1950s. After the shake-up caused by Parker's play, Young acts soothingly, aided by the characteristic sound of his saxophone's lower register.

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Prewar USA pop orchestras, 78rpm shellac rip


American pre-war records with very good sound. Clinton has a great chorus of saxophones, the orchestra is good, but Bea Wain sings so-so, Ellington orchestra emits a powerful rhythm energy with perfectly played and recorded solo on the clarinet in the middle, Ella lively and perky, can be compared with the previous version. The last two records – subtle tenors, fashionable in the 1920s, The Westerners – acoustic record, the most intelligible, but its charm in digital form is almost completely lost.

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Billie Holiday and Teddy Wilson, 1947 78 rpm shellac rip

The 1947 Columbia Hot Jazz Classic is a re-release of records from the 1930s and 1940s. The records are quite worn out, the quality is so-so – it is the tape re-recording with all the ensuing losses. Musically, Billy’s tandem with Wilson is great, never later was she so lucky with her partner.

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Billie Holiday ‎– Solitude, 1956 LP mono rip


The album is a prime example of Clef's recordings in the mid-1950s. The wholeness of the sound is somewhat lacking, but on successful tracks the vocals are still clear and tremulous – "You Turned The Tables On Me" and "You Go To My Head" are recorded cleanly and sound comfortable, in the second case only the piano failed.

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